Thursday, April 02, 2009

Bluetooth Marketing doesn’t have to be contentious, controversial or annoying

bluetooth-Vista_256 No, seriously, it doesn’t have to be this way. Regular readers of my blog will know that I’m not the biggest fan of bluetooth proximity marketing and that’s because implementation to date, has usually been a bit cack-handed with little thought to customers, their privacy and what they might actually want.

But there is light at the end of the tunnel with Troy Norcross’s latest report entitled Proximity Marketing with Bluetooth. The report is available to buy for $295 – I’ve seen it and it is a comprehensive best practice guide for marketing via bluetooth to ensure it doesn’t become bluespam. In addition, there are some key findings from the research the authors conducted, including

  • Consumers are 50% more likely to accept Bluetooth marketing if you have a poster describing the activity than without
  • Bluetooth Marketing is able to target an audience with pinpoint accuracy, based on location
  • While it is legal to broadcast Bluetooth messages to anybody, without permission, the Direct Marketing Association recommends more strict guidelines for this sort of communication
  • The public's understanding of Bluetooth technology has improved greatly in the last two years
  • Big media agencies are still wary of the technology, and traditional media buyers are yet to routinely include it in their media planning
  • When best practice is followed, there is little chance of users considering the communication as spam
  • The area in which you use Bluetooth is very important, it should never be a public space, only commercial
  • The cost of implementing a Bluetooth campaign is always more predictable and usually lower than SMS campaigns

If this is an area of interest for you, then you could do worse than buy the report or at least check out the teaser.